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FAQ

Browse through some of our frequently asked questions
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Click on the questions below to find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about spinal cord injury and Spinal Cord Injury BC.

What is a spinal cord injury?

A spinal cord injury (SCI) damages the communication pathway between the brain and certain parts of the body. Depending on the extent of the damage and its location in the cord, serious and permanent physical consequences will result in varying degrees of severity. Limbs or organs will not function as they did before. Read more about spinal cord injury.

Is SCI BC affiliated with the Rick Hansen Foundation?

SCI BC is an independent organization not affiliated with the Rick Hansen Foundation.

Is SCI BC a registered charitable organization?

Yes, SCI BC is a not for profit organization that was formed in 1957. Our charitable registration number is 11883 5024 RR0001. We are also a corporate partner of the Canadian Paraplegic Association, a national organization formed in 1945. Read more about SCI BC…

Where does SCI BC operate?

SCI BC operates throughout British Columbia. Our InfoLine is available via a toll free number (1-800-689-2477). Our Peer services are available in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, Victoria, Nanaimo, Prince George, Fort St. John, Williams Lake, Kamloops, Kelowna, Vernon, and Quesnel. Our head office is located in Vancouver. Read more about SCI BC.

How does SCI BC help people?

SCI BC has two core, province-wide community services through which it serves British Columbians with a spinal cord injury.

Peer Support Program
Information Services

What does SCI BC do?

SCI BC helps people with spinal cord injury (and those with related physical disabilities) and their families adjust, adapt and thrive in their new lives by providing answers, information and unique community experiences. SCI BC currently serves over 1,200 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in British Columbia. Read more about our programs and services.

Is there a cure?

Currently there is no cure for spinal cord injury. Although researchers continue to make steady progress toward understanding spinal cord injury and new strategies to overcome it, a cure is likely to be a long way off in the future. Read more about spinal cord injury.

What are the biggest challenges for people with spinal cord injuries?

Aside from the physical and emotional recovery, the main issues for individuals with SCI are financial concerns, lack of appropriate accessible housing and transportation, access to adequate personal care supports, and high unemployment. Read more about spinal cord injury.

How many injuries will happen this year?

It is estimated that 500 new spinal cord injuries will occur this year in British Columbia. Read more about spinal cord injury.

How many people have spinal cord injuries?

It is estimated that 85,556 persons have a spinal cord injury in Canada, 12,000 in British Columbia. Read more about spinal cord injury.

At what age is a person likely to have a spinal cord injury?

Almost half of new traumatic injuries occur in people 15 to 39 (most male) as a result of motor vehicle accidents, sporting accidents and other external causes. However in 2010, the average age of injury was 48 years. Read more about spinal cord injury.

What causes spinal cord injuries?

It is estimated that there are 4,529 new cases of spinal cord injury in Canada each year, 1,786 as the result of traumatic injury from external causes such as car crashes and the remaining as a consequence of diseases and other non-traumatic causes. Read more about spinal cord injury.

What is Quadriplegia?

Quadriplegia (or Tetraplegia), is the result of a spinal cord lesion at the level of the neck (cervical vertebrae). A loss of motor function and sensation or of both together, occurs in the legs, arms and trunk, including the thorax (chest). The severity of the loss does vary. Read more about spinal cord injury.

What is Paraplegia?

Paraplegia is the result of a spinal cord lesion located at the level of the thoracic vertebrae or lower down in the lumbar/or sacro-coccygeal regions. Loss of motor function or sensation affects the legs and the lower trunk. Read more about spinal cord injury.

How can I contact SCI BC?

For contact details visit our “Contact Us” page.